Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Review: Joyride by Anna Banks

Title: Joyride
Author: Anna Banks
Genre: young adult, contemporary
Series: N/A
Pages: 288
Published: June 2015
Source: received for review from publisher
Rating: 3.5/5

A popular guy and a shy girl with a secret become unlikely accomplices for midnight pranking, and are soon in over their heads—with the law and with each other—in this sparkling standalone from NYT-bestselling author Anna Banks.

It’s been years since Carly Vega’s parents were deported. She lives with her brother, studies hard, and works at a convenience store to contribute to getting her parents back from Mexico.

Arden Moss used to be the star quarterback at school. He dated popular blondes and had fun with his older sister, Amber. But now Amber’s dead, and Arden blames his father, the town sheriff who wouldn’t acknowledge Amber's mental illness. Arden refuses to fulfill whatever his conservative father expects.

All Carly wants is to stay under the radar and do what her family expects. All Arden wants is to NOT do what his family expects. When their paths cross, they each realize they’ve been living according to others. Carly and Arden’s journey toward their true hearts—and one another—is funny, romantic, and sometimes harsh.


I liked this a lot! There were some odd sentences to be found in the narrative, there was the infamous odd shift from 3rd person to first for different characters, the "prank" angle seemed like a flimsy excuse to give the characters a reason to hang out...

But Banks sells this story and these characters. It helps that the light side of the plot is balanced by the darker aspects for both kids. Carly (our first person narrator) struggles with a lot of issues for such a short boook - some that internal: feeling successful, valued, etc., and some of it external: familial, society. Arden (our third-person narrator) has different issues complicating his life - some from the same type of source (family, society) but for different reasons and with different reactions. I wasn't as sold on how much they needed each other after a short time (he didn't even know her before school and 6 weeks in and they're inseparable?) but I liked how they both complemented and challenged one another as the story continued.

I liked that Joyride wasn't afraid to showcase the negative sides of an interracial relationship in a less than progressive area of the US. Just as it is important to show diversity in fiction, it's also important to be honest and real about what that can look like in real life. Not everyone will be okay with interracial dating, sadly, even in 2015. But I looooved that Banks's characters call out the racism and prejudices shown by others. Racism, ableism, and more rear their ugly heads for Carly and Arden to contend with as they try to have fun and live a little.

This is an entertaining contemporary that has depth, humor, and heart. Joyride could be considered escapist fun (ya contemporary! romance! pranks!) except that also manages to make a few pointed statements on culture and society. It felt and read realistically - from the silly to the serious, Anna Banks' contemporary offering is a good fit for fans of The Book of Broken Hearts or The Summer of Chasing Mermaids both by Sarah Ockler. 




Friday, June 26, 2015

Review: Dumplin' by Julie Murphy

Title: Dumplin'
Author: Julie Murphy
Genre: young adult, contemporary
Series: N/A
Pages: 384
Published: expected September 15 2015
Source: publishers via edelweiss
Rating: 4.5/5

Self-proclaimed fat girl Willowdean Dickson (dubbed “Dumplin’” by her former beauty queen mom) has always been at home in her own skin. Her thoughts on having the ultimate bikini body? Put a bikini on your body. With her all-American beauty best friend, Ellen, by her side, things have always worked . . . until Will takes a job at Harpy’s, the local fast-food joint. There she meets Private School Bo, a hot former jock. Will isn’t surprised to find herself attracted to Bo. But she is surprised when he seems to like her back.

Instead of finding new heights of self-assurance in her relationship with Bo, Will starts to doubt herself. So she sets out to take back her confidence by doing the most horrifying thing she can imagine: entering the Miss Clover City beauty pageant—along with several other unlikely candidates—to show the world that she deserves to be up there as much as any twiggy girl does. Along the way, she’ll shock the hell out of Clover City—and maybe herself most of all.

With starry Texas nights, red candy suckers, Dolly Parton songs, and a wildly unforgettable heroine— Dumplin’ is guaranteed to steal your heart.

Reading Dumplin' is worthwhile for a lot of reasons. It's a fun book. It's funny because Willow is funny and her voice is vibrant. It's authentic, in regards to Willow, and also to her Southern roots and more. It's also honest. Julie Murphy's second novel is full of heart but also sass and sarcasm, uncertainty, and the pains of adolescence. It's about much more than Willow losing weight or dieting. Dumplin' is about love, and acceptance, growing up and sometimes even growing apart. It's a contemporary novel that touches on a lot of themes and does so with genuine warmth and often just the right amount of humor. 

Willow's story isn't typical for most YA audiences. Not only is she a self-proclaimed fat girl but Willow doesn't spend the book's 384 pages trying to lose that weight. Her lifestory isn't just a number on a scale; she is so much more than that and Julie Murphy characterizes her ably and even-handedly. Willow is the main character but she's also far from perfect. She's a good friend most of the time, a good daughter most of the time, etc. What I like most about her though, is that her interests and hobbies aren't limited towards weighing less or hating herself/changing her appearance. Willow is a complex and interesting person with a lot going on over the course of the novel. Even when she does struggle with her appearance, Dumplin' (and Willow) remain body positive.

If the plot in the second half of the book had been less concerned with the town's beauty pageant, I'd be 5-starring this. The first half, with the friendship issues and the family grief mixed with newfound attraction, just worked better for me. This is still 4.5 stars, though. The story at the heart of Dumplin' is wonderful, and about so much more than weight. It's about growing up, growing apart, becoming independent, recognizing your self-worth... etc. The pageant angle ties in pretty well (and does make for a great finale), especially with Willow's mother's arc, but it didn't capitalize on the emotion generated by the less showy plotlines (like Lucy's death, Ellen's family situation) from earlier in the story.

There are also some excellent kissing scenes. The romance is sweet without being saccharine. I also liked the complexity of Willow's romantic life. It's not a love triangle, but neither is Willow's love life a decided thing from the start. Murphy also spends much more time fleshing out the friendships between the teenagers than the romantic relationships. I love reading about positive girl friendships in YA and by and large, Dumplin' features some pretty strong female friendships.


Julie Murphy does an excellent job of showing what a teenage girl like Willow's life could conceivably be like. Dumplin' feels and reads very real from the first chapter. Willowdean has a memorable voice; one that I won't be forgetting. I think a lot of readers will find something of themselves in this book --- maybe not in Willow but in Hannah or Ellen or Millie.

Recc'd for: fans of Robin Brande's Fat Cat or K.A. Barson's 45 Pounds (More or Less). 


 

Friday, June 19, 2015

Book Tour Review: Mireille by Molly Cochran

Title: Mireille
Author: Molly Cochran
Genre: historical fiction
Series: N/A

Pages: 573
Published: June 9 2015
Source: TLC Book Tours for review
Rating: 3/5

Near the end of World War II, seventeen-year-old Mireille de Jouarre flees the home of her stepfather, a Nazi collaborator and abusive drunk. She finds shelter with her childhood friend Stefan, and the two fall deeply in love. But as the fighting escalates, Mireille must escape alone to Paris, where she discovers she’s pregnant and lacking a way to provide for her child.

So begins her new life as l’Ange—the Angel. After an unlikely meeting with a wealthy aristocrat in a Parisian hotel—and her acceptance of his solicitation—Mireille becomes the most celebrated poule in all of France, eliciting huge fees and invitations to exclusive parties. At one of these events, Mireille meets Oliver Jordan, an American womanizer and film producer, and is soon launching a promising film career. As her star rises, Mireille is determined to bury her past. But her success isn’t as carefree and glittery as it seems, and when her daughter’s future is threatened, Mireille must make a deadly decision in a desperate attempt to finally choose her own path.
 

Sprawling and epic, Molly Cochran's historical fiction novel pivots on the unlikely and lengthy tale of Mireille Orlande de Jouarre. It's dramatic and outlandish, strains credulity and yet somehow, either due to character charisma or through sheer momentum, never strays into "too much" territory. If you liked the dramatic flair and urgency of Jennifer Donnelly's Tea Rose series a few years ago, Mireille is a story much in the same historical vein. Through a few missteps and an engaging plot, Molly Cochran's take on a rags-to-riches story set against some of most dramatic backdrops in history makes for interesting reading.

With her adult novel, Cochran has graduated from her YA roots. Her themes here are darker, her plots less linear and more open to moral ambiguity, her characters more complex. There are a lot of subplots and themes that creep up over the almost six hundred pages of Mireille: Nazism, star crossed love, abuse, prostitution, obsession, teenage pregnancy, control -- to name a few. When I say reading Mireille can strain credulity, I mean this overabundance. With so much going on, so many balls in the air, even with the hundreds of pages Mireille has to work with, not all of it can be pulled o satisfactorily or even injected into the storyline naturally.

Mireille, the main character and nexus that pulls everything together, is capable. Her gifts may verge on the ridiculous (she is the most beautiful, always, no matter what has happened or where she is, etc. etc.) but there is charisma to her as well. You want to root for Mireille as she suffers setback after setback and still just does not give up. Her choices are hard and often not easy, but she's an interesting character and she's unpredictable. She's a survivor, and she demands respect, often on her terms. I can't say I connected with any other character to any degree, or was even as interested in them as I was Mireille (exception: Barbara) which is why I wanted more personality from the secondary cast.

Mireille is a long, detailed, character-driven book, but for the right kind of reader, it is absolutely the right book. If you're drawn to dramatic and exciting plots where women succeed against odds (though not infallibly) Mireille is likely the next book for you. The plot can hinge on either exceedingly lucky or unlikely happenstance, but the merits outweigh the issues for me.



Molly Cochran’s TLC Book Tours TOUR STOPS:

Monday, June 8th: Patricia’s Wisdom
Tuesday, June 9th: Built By Story
Thursday, June 11th: Kahakai Kitchen
Monday, June 15th: Broken Teepee
Tuesday, June 16th: Life is Story
Wednesday, June 17th: 100 Pages a Day
Thursday, June 18th: Book Lovin’ Hippo
Friday, June 19th: Ageless Pages Reviews
Monday, June 22nd: From the TBR Pile
Monday, June 22nd: The World As I See It
Tuesday, June 23rd: A Literary Vacation
Wednesday, June 24th: Bell, Book & Candle
Thursday, June 25th: Savvy Verse & Wit
Friday, June 26th: Thoughts on This ‘n That
Monday, June 29th: The Avid Reader
Tuesday, June 30th: Life By Kristen

Book Tour Review: Return to the Outer Banks House by Diann Ducharme

Title: Return to the Outer Banks House
Author: Diann Ducharme
Genre: historical fiction
Series: Untitled #2
Pages: 418
Published: December 2014
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours for review
Rating: 3/5

She was the spirited daughter of a North Carolina plantation owner, and he was a poor fisherman who she tutored on the porch of her family's Nags Head cottage. When we last saw Abigail Sinclair and Ben Whimble at the close of "The Outer Banks House," they'd overcome their differences in life stations and defied convention to begin their new life together.

But now it's seven years later, and "Return to the Outer Banks House" finds the couple married and in hard times-riddled by poverty, miscarriages, and weakened family ties. The strong bonds that once held them together have eroded over time, and their marriage threatens to unravel, particularly when relationships from the past and ambitions for the future find their way into the mismatched couple's present predicament.

Can their love survive? Or are the challenges they face insurmountable? "Return to the Outer Banks House" carries readers back to 1875 to answer these questions and explore the ebb and flow of a rocky marriage set against the enchanting North Carolina shoreline. Replete with history, intrigue, and plenty of maritime drama, it's an evocative tale of struggle in the Reconstruction-era South.
 

Earlier this month, I read Diann Ducharme's debut novel The Outer Banks House (and reviewed it here). A historical fiction novel that focused on the unlikely but interesting tale of a planter's daughter and a poor fisherman in 1860's Nags Head, it was detailed, fresh, and inviting. Diann Ducharme once again returns to those same characters and same place in North Carolina in a further exploration of the lives of Abby and Ben with Return to the Outer Banks House.

Set in the late 1870's both Ben and Abby are featured prominently with alternating POVs like before, but with Return to the Outer Banks House Ducharme gives (a memorable) voice to Eliza Dickens, a former side character from the first book. Eliza's view differs from the others in a lot of important ways and also forms a different side than the one previously known of Ben. She's an interesting character and she adds a lot to both the story and the cast. She can be difficult and unlikeable, but Eliza has personality and a voice.

This book is a bit bleak, I have to admit. A lot of the turns and plotting can be frustrating for anyone who was wholly satisfied with how The Outer Banks House left things at the end. Return to the Outer Banks House does a lot of different things both for and to the characters, usually playing with the theme of love and change as it does, but it can be dispiriting to read for fans. That said, fans who want more time spent with these characters will find hundreds of pages to do so here with the sequel.


The Outer Banks Series Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, May 25
Spotlight & Giveaway at Raven Haired Girl

Tuesday, May 26
Guest Post & Giveaway at Susan Heim on Writing

Wednesday, May 27
Review (Book One) at Back Porchervations

Thursday, May 28
Review (Book One) at In a Minute

Friday, May 29
Interview & Giveaway at Historical Fiction Obsession
Spotlight at The Never-Ending Book

Saturday, May 30
Spotlight at Becky on Books

Sunday, May 31
Review (Book One) at Book Nerd

Monday, June 1
Review (Book Two) at Let them Read Books
Spotlight at I’d So Rather Be Reading

Tuesday, June 2
Review (Book One) at Book Lovers Paradise

Wednesday, June 3
Review (Book Two) at Back Porchervations

Thursday, June 4
Spotlight & Giveaway (Book One) at View from the Birdhouse

Friday, June 5
Review (Book One) at Bibliotica

Sunday, June 7
Review (Book One) at Carole’s Ramblings

Monday, June 8
Review (Book One) at Ageless Pages Reviews
Guest Post at Curling Up With A Good Book

Tuesday, June 9
Review & Giveaway (Book One) at A Literary Vacation

Wednesday, June 10
Review (Both Books) at Unshelfish
Spotlight at CelticLady’s Reviews

Thursday, June 11
Review (Book Two) at Book Lovers Paradise
Interview at Boom Baby Reviews

Friday, June 12
Review (Book Two) at Bibliotica
Spotlight at Caroline Wilson Writes

Sunday, June 14
Review (Book Two) at Carole’s Ramblings

Monday, June 15
Review & Giveaway (Both Books) at Genre Queen

Tuesday, June 16
Interview at Books and Benches
Spotlight at The Lit Bitch

Wednesday, June 17
Review (Both Books) at Luxury Reading

Thursday, June 18
Review (Book One) at Books and Benches
Interview at Layered Pages

Friday, June 19
Review (Book One) at Build a Bookshelf
Review (Book Two) at Ageless Pages Reviews

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Book Tour Review: The Seven Sisters by Lucinda Riley

Title: The Seven Sisters
Author: Lucinda Riley
Genre: historical fiction, general fiction
Series: Seven Sisters #1
Pages: 636
Published: May 5 2015
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours for review
Rating: 3.75/5

Maia D’Apliese and her five sisters gather together at their childhood home, “Atlantis”—a fabulous, secluded castle situated on the shores of Lake Geneva—having been told that their beloved father, who adopted them all as babies, has died. Each of them is handed a tantalizing clue to her true heritage—a clue which takes Maia across the world to a crumbling mansion in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Once there, she begins to put together the pieces of her story and its beginnings.

Eighty years earlier in Rio’s Belle Epoque of the 1920s, Izabela Bonifacio’s father has aspirations for his daughter to marry into the aristocracy. Meanwhile, architect Heitor da Silva Costa is devising plans for an enormous statue, to be called Christ the Redeemer, and will soon travel to Paris to find the right sculptor to complete his vision. Izabela—passionate and longing to see the world—convinces her father to allow her to accompany him and his family to Europe before she is married. There, at Paul Landowski’s studio and in the heady, vibrant cafes of Montparnasse, she meets ambitious young sculptor Laurent Brouilly, and knows at once that her life will never be the same again.

In this sweeping, epic tale of love and loss—the first in a unique, spellbinding series of seven novels—Lucinda Riley showcases her storytelling talent like never before.
 

With the imaginative plot, charismatic characters, and dual-timeline structure, it's easy to see why fans of Kate Morton have discovered a new favorite option with Lucinda Riley's novels. My first foray into Riley's bibliography proved to be a success due to the smart writing, the even pacing, and my inability to put The Seven Sisters down once I had started reading. A loose retelling/reinterpretation of the myth of the Seven Sisters of the Pleiades, the first novel is centered around the oldest sister, Maia and takes readers from Geneva to Rio de Janeiro. 

There are a lot of mysterious characters and histories in Lucinda Riley's latest. Maia's five sisters were each adopted, like she was. None of them know much about their past or where they came from, nor even about the man who adopted them to create his family. As Maia searches for herself -- both in the past and in the present -- Riley fills the story with an excellent secondary cast. Her present family -- the Sisters, Marina, Pa Salt -- are vividly rendered, but still just not quite on the level of Maia, her great-grandmother Bel, and Bel's acquaintance Laurent. In fact, the historical timeline in 1920s Brazil was so vibrant and detailed, it almost overshadowed its more current counterpart of the plot.

The dual narrative timeline is tricky to pull off for some authors, especially if they do not have the characters necessary to make it worth. Happily, I liked this cast a lot. They were interesting, dynamic, and not stagnant or boring. The issue with fleshing out all these people was that sometimes Riley would tell rather than show in her dialogue. I've rarely found that a logical person will say "well I am a logical person, so I am logically talking about [x]" etc. By and large, the novel's characters and dialogue aren't bluntly rendered so it really stuck out in the times that it does happen throughout The Seven Sisters.

For such a long book, The Seven Sisters reads well and easily. There were a few times when the pacing felt slightly off or the narrative spent too long in one particular timeline, but for the most part, The Seven Sisters is a solidly enjoyable, detailed, and fun read.

The Seven Sisters Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, June 1
Review & Giveaway at Peeking Between the Pages
Spotlight & Giveaway at A Novel Review

Tuesday, June 2
Review at Just One More Chapter
Spotlight at Let them Read Books

Wednesday, June 3
Review at Always With a Book
Review & Giveaway at 100 Pages a Day

Thursday, June 4
Review at Book Nerd
Review at The Lit Bitch

Saturday, June 6
Interview & Giveaway at Bibliophilia, Please

Sunday, June 7
Spotlight & Giveaway at Teddy Rose Book Reviews Plus More

Monday, June 8
Review at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!

Tuesday, June 9
Review at CelticLady’s Reviews
Review at Ageless Pages Reviews

Wednesday, June 10
Spotlight & Giveaway at Passages to the Past

Thursday, June 11
Review at She is Too Fond of Books

Friday, June 12
Review at A Novel Review
Review at A Literary Vacation
Spotlight & Giveaway at To Read, or Not to Read

Monday, June 8, 2015

Book Tour Review: The Outer Banks House by Diann Ducharme

Title: The Outer Banks House
Author: Diann Ducharme
Genre: general fiction, historical fiction
Series: N/A
Pages: 304
Published: 2010
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours for review
Rating: 3.5/5

As the wounds of the Civil War are just beginning to heal, one fateful summer would forever alter the course of a young girl’s life.

In 1868, on the barren shores of post-war Outer Banks North Carolina, the once wealthy Sinclair family moves for the summer to one of the first cottages on the ocean side of the resort village of Nags Head. Seventeen-year-old Abigail is beautiful, book-smart, but sheltered by her plantation life and hemmed-in by her emotionally distant family. To make good use of time, she is encouraged by her family to teach her father’s fishing guide, the good-natured but penniless Benjamin Whimble, how to read and write. And in a twist of fate unforeseen by anyone around them, there on the porch of the cottage, the two come to love each other deeply, and to understand each other in a way that no one else does.

But when, against everything he claims to represent, Ben becomes entangled in Abby's father's Ku Klux Klan work, the terrible tragedy and surprising revelations that one hot Outer Banks night brings forth threaten to tear them apart forever.

With vivid historical detail and stunning emotional resonance, Diann Ducharme recounts a dramatic story of love, loss, and coming of age at a singular and rapidly changing time in one of America’s most beautiful and storied communities.

I was largely drawn to Diann Ducharme's The Outer Banks House due to the time (late 1860s America) and the setting (North Carolina) that were depicted. America after the Civil War is rife with interesting and terrible things happening and exploring Abby's personal growth against a backdrop of civil rights made for an absorbing read. Though only about three hundred pages, this story tells a familiar tale but does so with care and attention. With excellent place-as-character and detail, The Outer Banks House is a good fit for historical fiction fans looking for a story set during this time.

Diann Ducharme's novel has a lot of things going for it, and Abby is chief among them. Her characterization is well-handled in that she seems like a modern woman for her time without being anachronistic. She starts off the novel with certain ideas and beliefs that one might expect from a planter's daughter, but as those beliefs are challenged, she evolves as a character. She shares the POV with her counterpart of Ben Whimble, a man whose life has been the opposite of Abigail's prior to moving to the eponymous Outer Banks House. Ben was also a highlight for me. In a book that has the setting down, the characterization was a pleasant surprise. Ben is a complex man and much more than he appears. It's also refreshing to see a romance where the man has such respect for his love interest's intelligence. 

I also was intrigued by the relationship and parallels of Abby's life with that of her mother's. Their relationship was a convoluted one; made of resentment and anger and love and expectation. The issues that Abby faced with understanding her father are vastly different than those she had with her mother, and I found myself far more caught on the latter issue. It's not a major plotline in the novel but it did make for even more dimension for both Abby and Ingrid's characters. 

The Outer Banks House is a novel that flows well and is also paced wonderfully. A lot happens in three hundred pages but it doesn't feel rushed or unnatural. Abby's evolution takes place in an authentic and believable manner, and her growing romance with Ben is treated in the same way. Occasionally, Ducharme would hit a sentence that described life in the South perfectly ("Our first full day in Nags Head unfolded as thick and warm as honey from the hive.") and it's remarkably easy to get caught up in the story being told. Though the books wraps up pretty neatly, I'm also excited to see what happens in Ducharme's next novel, Return to the Outer Banks House. Check back for that review later this month!









The Outer Banks Series Blog Tour Schedule


Monday, May 25
Spotlight & Giveaway at Raven Haired Girl


Tuesday, May 26
Guest Post & Giveaway at Susan Heim on Writing


Wednesday, May 27
Review (Book One) at Back Porchervations


Thursday, May 28
Review (Book One) at In a Minute


Friday, May 29
Interview & Giveaway at Historical Fiction Obsession
Spotlight at The Never-Ending Book


Saturday, May 30
Spotlight at Becky on Books


Sunday, May 31
Review (Book One) at Book Nerd


Monday, June 1
Review (Book Two) at Let them Read Books
Spotlight at I’d So Rather Be Reading


Tuesday, June 2
Review (Book One) at Book Lovers Paradise


Wednesday, June 3
Review (Book Two) at Back Porchervations


Thursday, June 4
Spotlight & Giveaway (Book One) at View from the Birdhouse


Friday, June 5
Review (Both Books) at Bibliotica


Sunday, June 7
Review (Book One) at Carole’s Ramblings


Monday, June 8
Review (Book One) at Ageless Pages Reviews
Guest Post at Curling Up With A Good Book


Tuesday, June 9
Review & Giveaway (Book One) at A Literary Vacation


Wednesday, June 10
Review (Both Books) at Unshelfish
Spotlight at CelticLady’s Reviews


Thursday, June 11
Review (Book Two) at Book Lovers Paradise
Interview at Boom Baby Reviews


Friday, June 12
Spotlight at Caroline Wilson Writes


Sunday, June 14
Review (Book Two) at Carole’s Ramblings


Monday, June 15
Review & Giveaway (Both Books) at Genre Queen


Tuesday, June 16
Interview at Books and Benches
Spotlight at The Lit Bitch


Wednesday, June 17
Review (Both Books) at Luxury Reading


Thursday, June 18
Review (Book One) at Books and Benches
Interview at Layered Pages


Friday, June 19
Review (Book One) at Build a Bookshelf
Review (Book Two) at Ageless Pages Reviews

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Jessie's May Book Haul

Ok, so it's been a while since I've posted a book haul or more than once or twice a week. So you know this post long. Like... 20-pictures long. Note I didn't say 20 books -- pictures. Some of them have multiple books because I am terrible, with no self control. I'm doing my part to keep publishing afloat, building a library, etc, etc.

That said, there are a lot of really cool book in this. These three miiiight be my favorites:



Poison, Charm, Beauty by Sarah Pinborough. These are fairy tale retellings and as gorgeous as they are in pictures? Even  more in public. 




Okay, now that I've drooled... here are some more exciting books I was sent over the last few weeks:











The Tide Watchers by Lisa Chaplin
The Seven Sisters by Lucinda Riley
Love is Red by Sophie Jaff
Love May Fail by Matthew Quick
Earth Flight by Janet Edwards (Earth Girl #3)
Invasion of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

Thank you TLC Book Tours, Bloomsbury Publishing, Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, and HarperCollins!

Borrowed from the lovely Morgan at Gone with the Words: Rook by Sharon Cameron and The Witch Hunter by Virginia Boecker



Won: Wolf by Wolf by Ryan Graudin





Gifted from Bonnie at For Love of Words: Prudence by Gail Carriger.
Gifted from Ashleigh Page of The YA Kitten: The Half-Life of Molly Pierce by Katrina Leno, and The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbaugh




Also traded for from Bonnie: an ARC of The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton




Sent from the author: Medicis Daughter by Sophie Perinot





Bought:







Oberyn Punko Pop is the best and likes to hang out with Toothless and Drogon.











The Iron King by Maurice Druon (The Accursed Kings #1)
The She-Wolf by Maurice Druon (The Accursed Kings #5)
Daughter of Deep Silence by Carrie Ryan
The Isle of the Lost by Melissa De La Cruz (The Descendants #1)
The Moon and More by Sarah Dessen
Girl on a Wire by Gwenda Bond
Uprooted by Naomi Novik
A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas
Nimona by Noelle Stevenson
The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh
The Shoemaker's Wife by Adriana Trigiani
The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith
The Fill-In Boyfriend by Kasie West

and since you've stuck it out this far, another book that has been gorgeously outfitted:



The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey (The Girl at Midnight #1). I've already read and loved this but I had to have the UK cover. You can clearly see why.



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